Sunday, March 27, 2011

Tickle Liposuction

Does "Tickle Liposuction" Really Tickle?

Several liposuction techniques/machines, such as the VASER and Smart Liposuction, have been developed during the past decade which has drawn significant attention from the media.  Recently, a new liposuction technique, the "Tickle Liposuction", has emerged.   Does the "Tickle Liposuction" really tickle?  That is the question.

Photocredit: celebritylaserspa.com

Fast Facts about the "Tickle Liposuction"    
  • Tickle liposuction is FDA-approved in the United States.
  • It's a variation of the power-assisted liposuction (PAL).
  • "Tickle liposuction" has a cannula that rotates through a small conical arc of motion.  This rotation of the cannula produce a "tickling sensation" that patients feel during the process of liposuction.  
  • The patient is aware of this "tickling" sensation only when the patient is awake while the liposuction is being performed.
  • Currently, there is no published clinical data or trial comparing this liposuction method with other techniques.
Is It Safe to Have Tickle Liposuction done in an Office Setting?
  • A safe surgical facility for liposuction must be able to minimize the risks of surgical infections that may occur after your procedure.  These kind of procedures should be done in operating rooms that maintain high standards for cleanliness. All surgical instruments should be steam-sterilized since cold sterilization of liposuction instruments is below the standard of care.
  • Your physician should maintain competency in Advance Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) when this procedure is being performed for safety reasons.
 Are there different levels of Office-Based Anesthesia?
  • Yes.
Level I Services: Delivery of analgesics or anxiolytics by mouth, as prescribed for the patient on order of a physician, at a dose level low enough to allow the patient to remain ambulatory
Level II Services: Delivery of analgesics or anxiolytics by mouth in dosages greater than allowed at Level I and tumescent anesthesia, as prescribed for the patient on order of a physician
Level III Services: Delivery of analgesics or anxiolytics other than by mouth, including intravenously, intramuscularly, or rectally
Level IV Services: Delivery of general anesthetics, including regional anesthetics and monitored anesthesia care

What is the Standard of Care for these kind of Services?
Level I services:
1.      at least two personnel must be present, including the physician who must be currently certified at least in AHA-approved BCLS; and
2.      the following age-appropriate equipment must be present:
1.      bag mask valve;
2.      oxygen;
3.      AED or other defibrillator; and
4.      pre-measured doses of epinephrine, atropine, adreno-corticoids, and antihistamines.

Level II services:
1.      at least two personnel must be present, including the physician who must be currently certified at least in AHA approved ACLS or PALS, as appropriate;
1.      another person must be currently certified at least in AHA approved BCLS; and
2.      a licensed health care provider, who may be one of the two required personnel, must attend the patient, until the patient is ready for discharge; and
2.      a crash cart must be present containing drugs and equipment necessary to carry out ACLS protocols, including, but not limited to, the following age-appropriate equipment:
1.      bag mask valve and appropriate airway maintenance devices;
2.      oxygen;
3.      AED or other defibrillator;
4.      pre-measured doses of first line cardiac medications, including epinephrine, atropine, adreno-corticoids, and antihistamines;
5.      IV equipment;
6.      pulse oximeter; and
7.      EKG Monitor.

Level III services:
1.      at least two personnel must be present, including the physician who must be currently certified at least in AHA approved ACLS or PALS, as appropriate;
1.      another person must be currently certified at least in AHA approved BCLS;
2.      a licensed health care provider, which may be either of the two required personnel, must attend the patient, until the patient is ready for discharge; and
3.      a person, who may be either of the two required personnel, must be responsible for monitoring the patient during the procedure; and
2.      the same equipment required for Level II;

Level IV services:
Physicians who practice medicine in Texas and who administer anesthesia or perform a procedure for which anesthesia services are provided in outpatient settings at Level IV shall follow current, applicable standards and guidelines as put forth by the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) including, but not limited to, the following:
1.      Basic Standards for Pre-anesthesia Care;
2.      Standards for Basic Anesthetic Monitoring;
3.      Standards for Post-anesthesia Care;
4.      Position on Monitored Anesthesia Care;
5.      The ASA Physical Status Classification System;
6.      Guidelines for Non-operating Room Anesthetizing Locations;
7.      Guidelines for Ambulatory Anesthesia and Surgery; and
8.      Guidelines for Office-Based Anesthesia.

I recommend to ask your plastic surgeon about different liposuction techniques when one is interested in liposuction.  Not everyone would be a candidate for liposuction.  The results of liposuction is not dependent on the machine but would be dependent by the skill and level of training of your plastic surgeon.  Remember that your safety is extremely important, and one should be fully informed before one undergoes any procedure.

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